Chang Mai, Thailand


When our airplane touched down on the Chang Mai runway with a loud thud, Thayer tapped Blair on the shoulder and said, “Mom, I think maybe we’ve landed somewhere.  Where are we this time?” And so it goes when a 6 year-old takes her 24th flight in a matter of 8 months.

A monk on our flight, heading through passport control in Chang Mai just before us

A monk on our flight, heading through Chang Mai’s passport control

Chang Mai is a booming metropolis next to Luang Prabang. The official city limits are home to 160,000 people but the urban sprawl surrounding it contains over one million people, making it the largest city in northern Thailand.  There is a vibrant expat community here and the city hosts over 5 million tourists every year, so the infrastructure supporting travelers is well-established. The “old city” where we are staying (within the ancient brick walls of the original citadel) contains over 100 temples, and the monks within are welcoming and eager to share their practices with tourists. Yet along with the ancient traditions and architecture, we have also seen a Starbucks coffee, 7-11, and McDonalds – sure signs of Western influence.  Admittedly, Blair did enjoy her first Starbucks mocha since December in Sydney.

Jeff snapped this photo of a monk in the aisle of a 7-11 across the street from his temple.  East meets West!

Jeff snapped this photo of a monk in the aisle of a 7-11. East meets West!

Our hotel is a little green oasis in the heart of the old city, and we have been soaking up the new vibe that Chang Mai brings to our journey.  Spicy Thai curries, $5 massages at our doorstep, booming night markets, more tuk tuk taxis, more saffron-robed monks, textiles, ceramics, hill tribes and even tiger petting… it’s been a busy week in many respects.  

First stop upon arrival, $3 foot massages for the Demers ladies!

First stop upon arrival, $3 foot massages for the Demers ladies!

Outside our hotel, in the heart of the city

Outside our hotel, in the heart of the city

On the other hand, the continued extreme heat and various ills for all three girls have held us back somewhat from getting as much out of our time here as we might have hoped.  After long stretches of good health this year, Southeast Asia continues to challenge us in this regard.

A Thai doctor makes a house call to our hotel room to check on both Zoe's and Thayer's high fever

A Thai doctor makes a house call to our hotel room to check on both Zoe and Thayer’s high fevers.

Despite these minor obstacles, we still had plenty of opportunity to explore Chang Mai and get acquainted with the wonders of N. Thailand…

BUDDHISM IN CHANG MAI

We began our stay in Chang Mai with a guided tour of Wat Chedi Luang, one of the oldest and most magnificent temples in Chang Mai.  The girls brought notebooks so that they could begin a research project on Buddhism, and our guide gave them a detailed history of both the temple and the story of Buddha.  We lasted about an hour because it must have been over 100 degrees by 10am; despite finding shade whenever possible, the girls wilted fast.  No amount of heat could lessen the beauty of the temples within the compound of Wat Chedi Luang, however. Truly a sight to behold! 

Thayer under cover, heading toward the Wat's entrance

Thayer under cover from the hot sun, heading toward the Wat’s entrance

The remains of the large stupa, a tribute to Buddha built in the 15th century

The remains of the large stupa, a tribute to Buddha built in the 15th century

The front of the main temple - looks a lot like a Luang Prabang temple because hundreds of years ago, Laos and N. Thailand were part of the same kingdom.

The front of the main temple – looks a lot like a Luang Prabang temple because hundreds of years ago, Laos and N. Thailand were part of the same kingdom.

In the shade near the stupa, the girls learn from our guide about the earthquake in 1545 that toppled much of the original strucure

In the shade near the stupa, the girls learn from our guide about the earthquake in 1545 that toppled much of the original structure

Last original remains of the Lanna style elephant sculptures jutting out from the stupa's walls

Last original remains of the Lanna style elephant sculptures jutting out from the stupa’s walls

There were lovely stone carvings and statues of Buddha throughout the compound

There were lovely stone carvings and statues of Buddha throughout the compound

Once inside the main temple, we were awestruck by the golden statues and pillars everywhere, and by the colorful prayer flags adorning the ceiling.

Looking at the front altar inside the temple

Looking at the front altar inside the temple

Looking up at the temple ceiling

Looking up at the temple ceiling

Zoe and Thayer practice their prostrations at the altar, as demonstrated by our guide

Zoe and Thayer practice their prostrations at the altar, as demonstrated by our guide

And taking notes on the story of Buddha's life

And taking notes on the story of Buddha’s life

THAYER: I thought that the temple was really unusual and I took some notes on Buddhism which was a new experience for me.

This Buddha statue greets you at the door of the temple.

This Buddha statue greets you at the door of the temple.

SCHUYLER: As the story goes, in ancient times there was a big drought and villages turned on each other to fight for water.  Buddha came to ask them if they’d rather have water or have their relatives live instead of kill each other, and the villagers decided they’d rather keep the peace and save the lives of their loved ones. The above statue of Buddha, holding his head up, means “bring peace, stop the fighting.”

We also enjoyed visiting the only remaining original (meaning not yet reinforced) wooden temple in Chang Mai, right next door to Wat Chedi Luang.  Slightly more understated but no less lovely, this temple happened to be hosting an important ceremony for young novice monks.  The boys, ages 11-13 years, were all being indoctrinated as monks at the time of our visit. We had the privilege of a sneak peek at this special occasion.

Lovely roof line of this original 15th century temple.

Lovely roof line of this original 15th century temple.

Alms bowls line a table at the back of the temple

Alms bowls line a table at the back of the temple

Our guide explains the time honored ceremony of indoctrinating novice monks

Our guide explains the time honored ceremony of indoctrinating novice monks

Young boys, preparing to become novice monks, listen quietly to a senior monk who is addressing them

Young boys, preparing to become novice monks, listen quietly to a senior monk who is addressing them

Then the boys process to an area where they can change from their white robes to their new orange monk robes

Then the boys process to an area where they can change from their white robes to their new orange monk robes

Outside the ancient temple, a garden of prayer flags honoring the Thai New Year this month

Within the grounds of the ancient temple, a garden of prayer flags honoring the Thai New Year this month

Thayer wanders the temple's perimeter

Thayer wanders the temple’s perimeter

ZOE: I wrote a long report on the story of Buddha’s life, from his birth to his death.  He was born in May (like me!) and he grew up as a prince within palace walls. The first time he was allowed to leave his palace he saw people who were suffering, sick and dying.  When he realized that people lived this way, he decided to give up his palace life and become a monk.  He meditated for many years with much struggle, but finally reached enlightenment.  From then on was known as Buddha.  He died in his 80s. It was interesting to learn about this history because I had never heard anything about this before. Being in the temples inspired me to learn so much about it all!

TIGER KINGDOM

OK, yes, this is a major tourist trap and likely controversial with animal rights activists world wide, but when presented with the opportunity to actually pet a baby tiger, we just couldn’t resist.  Tiger Kingdom is sort of like a zoo for tigers, where the big cats are raised from infancy by individual handlers who train them to interact safely (?) with visitors.  Visitors can opt for 15 minutes with the smallest tigers, the medium tigers, or the BIG tigers.  There are strict rules about how close you can get (right next to them, basically), and how to approach them and behave around them.  The handlers stay very close by.  But really, what kind of protection does a man with a wooden stick really offer when one is snuggling with an adult male tiger?  Not enough for us to take the bait (or for that matter, be the bait) on that one.  We stuck with the babies.  

These tigers are 4 months old and very playful!

These tigers are 4 months old and very playful!

Zoe is the first to snuggle up to this sleeping kitty

Zoe is the first to snuggle up to this sleeping kitty

Wearing a tiger scarf

Wearing a tiger scarf

THAYER:  When I was with the baby tigers I felt happy, joyful, and excited!  I was a little bit scared too, but they were very very nice.  And one of them whacked Zoe in the face!  But she was OK. 

If only I could join him for a snooze...

If only I could join him for a snooze…

SCHUYLER:  My experience at the Tiger Kingdom was so amazing. It was extremely nerve wracking because my face could be clawed off at any time by this baby tiger, so I had to mentally think of it as a sweet baby kitten rather than a big cat that could kill me.  I’d like to make the point that although I liked the fact that I was lying on a tiger, I also felt like I was putting my life at risk. 

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Jeff gets in on the action

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snuggles

ZOE: The Tiger Kingdom was THE BEST.  I never thought that I would actually be able to cuddle a tiger in my lifetime, but apparently I could!  I had so much fun snuggling with the cutest little 3-4 month olds.  Most of them were very sleepy, but a couple were pretty playful. I was a little bit nervous at first, before petting the tigers, because even though they were growing up with humans they are still TIGERS…. and who knows? But, everything was fine and we had the best time ever! 

LONG NECK VILLAGE

Nearby Tiger Kingdom is a cultural attraction known as the Long Neck Village.  This little hamlet of huts did not originally intend to be a large scale tourist destination. Rather, it was more of a refugee location for a tribe known as the “long neck people” or “Karen tribe.”  Schuyler was inspired to do a research project on this tribe after visiting the village, and can tell you more about it. 

SCHUYLER:  The Karen people are originally from Burma, but many now reside in Northern Thailand due to persecution by the Burmese who found their customs strange.  The women of this tribe layer golden rings up their necks to stretch them out.  Tourists call them the ‘giraffe people’ or the ‘long-neck people.’ Women modify their bodies like this because it is a sign of beauty; the longer your neck, the more beautiful you are. Some also think that the rings may have originated as protection from tigers.  The rings get so heavy that they condense the women’s shoulders over time and shrink their rib cages, creating the illusion of a longer neck. This tradition starts at the age of 3-5 years and they keep adding rings as the child gets older. Now in the modern world, you can chose to follow this tradition if you are one of the Karen people. Most children choose to carry on with the ritual even though it is very painful and it can make permanent scars on your body. 

Long Neck Tribal woman

Long Neck Tribal woman

Girls in the village, now filled with storefronts selling crafts and traditional wares outside of each mud hut

Girls in the village, now filled with storefronts selling crafts and traditional wares outside of each mud hut

With an older woman of the tribe, the longest neck we saw

With an older woman of the tribe, the longest neck we saw

Girls about the same age as our three, already beginning the practice of wearing their rings.

Girls about the same age as our three, already beginning the practice of wearing their rings.

THAYER: I thought Long Neck Village was kind of scary. At first I saw some of the older ladies who had stained teeth from chewing a special nut that makes their teeth dark purple.  I noticed that the ladies wore scarfs inside their neck rings, maybe so the rings don’t burn them in the hot sun. 

BLAIR:  While both the tiger petting and the Long Neck Village were interesting from a cultural standpoint and fascinating for the girls especially, I found them disconcerting from an ethical standpoint.  Seeing so many tigers penned in small enclosures, and forced to lie about all day while hundreds of tourists pose for photos, was pretty sad.  I suppose like with any zoo, there is an element of depression one feels looking at wild animals behind bars, but Tiger Kingdom in particular felt like a vehicle for tourism rather than a home away from home for the big cats. As for the Karen Tribe, I admit I was quite fascinated to see these women in person, and was particularly surprised by the number of children wearing the rings.  However, the village has become a string of dozens of vendors, all selling pretty much the same crafts and souvenirs, like a lane for tourists to walk down. This marred the authenticity of the experience.  It is clear that these people are now making their living off tourists who want to snap photos of their ringed necks, and I had to wonder whether the children were forced to continue the practice in part to preserve the tourist industry rather than to carry on the tradition for cultural reasons. 

THAI RECREATION

We had a fair amount of down time in Chang Mai so we tried to find some kid-friendly recreation options to spice things up a bit.  A huge, sparkling shopping mall provided a Thai arcade and Coldstone Creamery ice cream (just like in NH!) – nice way to kill the middle of a day in Chang Mai!

Zoe plays a Thai game like guitar hero, only with drumming

Zoe plays a Thai game like guitar hero, only with drumming

Coldstone Creamery - just like in NH!

Coldstone Creamery – just like in NH!

Jeff snapped this one - progressive monks?

Jeff snapped this one – progressive monks?

 Jeff found his own recreation at a “night golf” nine-hole course and driving range.  He took Zoe and Thayer over one night to hit some balls and enjoy the local golf culture.  In order to play the course, you had to have your own “Refresher” — otherwise known in the U.S as a caddy.  The Refreshers were all displayed on a poster board for your selection.  

Choose your own Refresher

Choose your own Refresher

The course stays open until midnight, and you pay extra as the night wears on due to the increasing electricity costs.  Jeff didn’t get to play the nine holes because it was fully booked – definitely a local hotspot!

Golf under the lights

Golf under the lights

In the cooler evenings we also wandered the endless walking streets filled with food stalls and souvenir vendors galore.

These are Thai massage chairs, lining the open streets for anyone to enjoy a quick foot rub

These are Thai massage chairs, lining the open streets for anyone to enjoy a quick foot rub

Assorted sweets on display at a food stall

Assorted sweets on display at a food stall

We think that the Portsmouth Farmer's Market could use a good waffle station like this one!

We think that the Portsmouth Farmer’s Market could use a good waffle station like this one!

ZOE:  Watch out NH because we want to buy a Thai tuk tuk and turn it into a waffle mobile/local taxi service, driving the streets of Portsmouth. Wahooo!

Exploring the temples at night is a much cooler option - Blair poses in front of a giant happy Buddha

Exploring the temples at night is a much cooler option – Blair poses in front of a giant happy Buddha

In the middle of one street, some live Thai boxing

In the middle of one street, some live Thai boxing

We also enjoyed some lazy days at our hotel while the kids were recovering from their various ailments.  Cards, Thai arts and crafts, swimming, and of course, some homework….

Cards in the restaurant

Cards in the restaurant

Schuyler learns how to fold lotus leaves into flower shapes

Schuyler learns how to fold lotus leaves into flower shapes

Thayer and Zoe do some Thai umbrella painting

Thayer and Zoe do some Thai umbrella painting

THAYER: I painted an umbrella with flowers on it and stripes. And also some butterflies.  I signed my signature on it. I am going to ship it home to Portsmouth.  You can’t use it in the rain at home because it is paper. But you use it for sunshine, to keep the hot sun off of you. 

Jeff and Zoe worked together on one

Jeff and Zoe worked together

Finished product

Finished product

ZOE: Every day the hotel sets up a little crafts stand and with different themes.  One day we did Tung making – these are flags made out of tissue paper that are used for Thai celebrations.  The umbrella painting was my favorite of these activities.  I hadn’t painted anything in a really long time, so it was enjoyable to have a brush in my hands again. I think mine turned out really well!  Dad helped me with my color choices and pattern and he couldn’t help but paint a little too.  It was really fun. 

My masterpiece

My masterpiece

AGAPE HOME

During our last couple of days in Chang Mai, we chose to spend our time doing some community service at the Agape Home. Founded in 1996 by a Canadian expat who has spent 40 years in Chang Mai, the Agape Home serves over 100 children ages 0-21 years who either have HIV/AIDS or have been impacted by the rise of HIV/AIDS in Thailand.  The majority of children have already lost  their parents to AIDS, and there are no other options for their care. Many others were abandoned at birth for unknown reasons.  Schuyler, Zoe and Thayer decided to use the remainder of last summer’s yard sale money (what was left over after adopting the orphaned elephants in Kenya) to support Agape and bring a little cheer to the children living there.  

We started our service project with a giant shopping spree at a local discount shopping center.  This was the most fun our three have had in a while!  It felt like one of those game shows where you have a certain amount of time to throw as much into your cart as you can.  We gleefully crammed clothes, shoes, stuffed animals, toys, and sports gear for children of all ages into our shopping cart.  The prices were pretty tough to beat, which made our shopping spree all the more exciting.  Granted, by the time we got to the cashier, we may have gone slightly over the yard sale proceeds, but Blair and Jeff were glad to support the girls’ generosity of spirit. 

Fun at the shopping center!

Fun at the shopping center!

We left with two carts full of JOY

We left with two carts full of JOY and three very excited girls

After our shopping expedition, Zoe unfortunately had to return to the hotel and get back into bed – all the excitement brought her fever back and she was so disappointed to miss out on our time at the children’s home.  Even the slightest exposure to her virus could be dangerous for the immune-compromised children at Agape. 

ZOE: I’ve had a bad fever and body aches for three days now and it’s getting a little boring.  I was so glad to be a part of the shopping, but was really disappointed that I couldn’t go be with the kids.  I felt badly that Dad had to miss out and stay home with me, but thankfully he got to go to the home on the second day of volunteering.  Of course, I still had a fever and stayed in bed.  UGH! 

A very sad Zoe

A very sad Zoe

Blair, Schuyler and Thayer drove about 30 minutes out to the center and spent a full afternoon touring the facilities, talking with the Founder, a very impressive and lovely woman named Avis Rideout, and of course, playing with the children!  We opted not to hand out our gifts per Avis’s request, so that she could take the time to sort through them and decide which children should receive which donations. She also wanted to put a lot away for Christmas.  But that didn’t seem to matter to our girls, who gladly threw themselves into the mix of babies, toddlers, and school-aged children for a couple of hours.  We loved our time there so much, Jeff returned the following afternoon with Schuyler and Thayer for another few hours of volunteering.

Thayer feeds a 6-month old girl, abandoned at birth

Thayer feeds a 6-month old girl, abandoned at birth

The babies sleep in here

The babies sleep in here

Older girls and boys sleep in bunk rooms like this one

Older girls and boys sleep in bunk rooms like this one

Thayer and Avis, with a little munchkin and a new toy

Thayer and Avis, with a little munchkin and a new toy

Schuyler fell in love with the youngest residents, and spent most of her time with them

Schuyler fell in love with the youngest residents, and spent most of her time with them

SCHUYLER: I loved helping out with the small babies.  I would hold them and snuggle them whenever they started to cry (which was a lot!).  It was my job to run around turning, repositioning, holding, or sitting the babies up when they got fussy. It was really fun and I’m so glad I could help. It felt so great to donate tons of toys and clothes to Agape.  Even though I won’t be there to witness it, I can’t wait for the children to receive their gifts!  I had such an amazing experience and I hope that when I am older, I can go volunteer there for a longer time.  If you are ever in Chang Mai, you HAVE to go and visit this place! 

The girls met the Home's nurse, and learned about the children's daily regimen of HIV medications

The girls met the Agape’s nurse, and learned about the children’s daily regimen of HIV medications

Thayer made a lot of 10-month old pals

Thayer made a lot of 18-month old pals

This little girls was found by a farmer, abandoned in a fertilizer bag near his garden

This little girl was found by a farmer, abandoned in a fertilizer bag near his garden

Schuyler is in heaven!

Schuyler is in heaven!

Relaxing...

This is pretty relaxing!

THAYER:  I mostly stayed with the babies and little kids at the Agape Home. The child I liked the most had a green shirt on and he wanted to be with me all the time. It was like I was his mother.  But I definitely wasn’t!  All of the babies were sooooo cute but it was hard to have time to play with them because the one little boy was hogging me.  It was hard to say no to him. I felt sad for all the others.  I went a second day and got to spend more time with the babies.  Some of the children gathered around me and started hugging me. I felt SO special! 

Both girls spent a lot of time with the youngest residents on their second afternoon at the center

Both girls spent a lot of time with the youngest residents on their second afternoon at the center

BLAIR:  Agape Home was truly a lovely place, filled with warmth and joy and beautifully managed by Avis and a large staff of Thai nannies, nurses, and helpers.  Many Westerners come and volunteer there for weeks at a time, contributing to the care and nurturing that all of these children receive.  Because very few of the children get adopted, this organization operates more as a home and family than as an orphanage per se.  I was extremely impressed with all that Avis and her family have accomplished on behalf of HIV/AIDS children and families in Chang Mai.  It was wonderful to once again incorporate some service into our travel experience – long overdue!

ONWARD….

Our travel clock is ticking away, and we are off on the next leg of our journey.  From Chang Mai, we now fly to Kunming, China and begin a 3-week stint in Yunnan Province and Beijing.  We have been told that WordPress is censored in China and we won’t be able to post on this blog site until we land in Japan in a few weeks.  So you won’t be hearing from us for a while, but we’ll have a LOT of great updates when we get this blog back online!  You can always track us down over email if the spirit moves you. Thank you for your continued love and support from afar… we truly appreciate it! 

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Categories: ASIA, Chang Mai, Thailand

7 comments

  1. Those little Thai babies are sooooo cute! Sorry the 3 Demers girls have all been a bit under the weather and here’s hoping for cooler temps and better health in Yunnan! xoxo

  2. Hello from Brackett Lane!

    Let’s see. The Farmer’s Market opened today!!! We rejoice! Louis danced to the band and came home with 3 egg sandwiches, an ice coffee, a smoothie, some banana bread and some pastry crumbs that didn’t seem to make it home to me…… hmmm…. We walked over to the LHS park, on the way we picked up Sam & Benjamin. Ziggy & Piper were planting in their garden. Nancy & John were doing yard work and Aspen had blown up her Jumpy Castle for her 4th Birthday Party! Things are hopping here!!! (minus the quietness within 80 Haven…..)

    Yesterday, we returned home from a week long vacation in Fort Lauderdale to see “Poppa & Nana”! Louie and Angelo had a ball in the ocean and pool. Bryan caught a “mid-August” tan and he’s pretty afraid he is going to loose it….. watch out Jeff, you still have competition!

    What a busy visit you’ve had. Don’t like all the fevers and such… 😦 But did you rub Buddha’s belly? I think you are craaaaaaazy for snuggling a tiger. Totally crazy! I was very interested in the giraffe-women….I think, if I tried, I could get a really long neck going. I got all welled up with tears looking at those beautiful babies…. will you bring one home? I know you want to Blair! They are just too cute!

    Love you to all and all the best in China!

    Love, Lindsay and the boys

  3. Dear Schuyler, Zoe, Thayer, Blair and Jeff,

    I continue to be astonished by the adventures you have! The sights, sounds, textures, scents… you convey them all through your stories and photos. I am so lucky to travel along “beside you”.

    What a lovely day you spent at Agape… the photos are filled with love and tenderness. You are naturals and the children clearly enjoyed your care.

    Enjoy your time in China. I look forward to “hearing all about it”!

    Paula

  4. Very very very nice that you could spend time at Agape and give the children toys for Christmas, birthdays and other special moments in their lives. It looks very natural how Schuyler and Thayer are caring for the babies!
    I hope China will bring you better health!! Must be SO annoying to miss out on special moments, together with the high fevers and a tired body of course.

    Looking forward to read about your new adventures! Enjoy & Take care!

    xoxo Linde

    ps. Thank you for putting your adventures in a blogpost again. And I understand your feelings about Tiger Kingdom and the long-neck tribe…

  5. These last two posts have left such a clear impression on me; as Paula states, the sensory experiences are intense! I am sorry about the illnesses and feeling crummy, and hope that China will bring improvement. I laughed at the descriptions of the elephants, worried about the baby tigers, was astounded at the long necks and agreed with Blair that tourism has its most ugly aspects in spite of helping small communities that depend on it. The heat and the descriptions of same are graphic and speaking of graphic I wish there had been more photos of Blair in her wet white tee shirt. As for Jeff, I think that when he returns home you kids might want to auction off his hair; this might defray some of the costs of the trip! Or we can braid it (I would help with that) and pass him off as an ageless hippie who still emulates the old days.
    I appreciate the fact that the girls are having many “hands on” experiences, be it growing a garden, weaving, making pottery, etc. The list is long, and you will have much to share with your classmates.This is for me one of the most remarkable aspects of the Demers adventure!
    All love
    Jean

  6. Boy oh boy!!!! What can I say? I just love reading all of the history that you are sharing with us. Those little babies were lucky to have you girls for some hugging and snuggling. I don’t think though, I would have been laying on those big cats.Hope to a quick recovery.xoxox

  7. I am so happy that you brought the culture and images of Asia into my being. You make it all come alive and for that I am grateful. Each leg of your journey continues to amaze me–the history, landscapes, cities, villages, weather, food, animals, and hands-on workshops all get a big tick. Schuyler, Zoe and Thayer–I am so sorry you fell sick–if you were home you would probably have picked up some bug that goes around school each year. More fun to be riding Elephants and cuddling with Tigers. Remember to hydrate well in that heat–hard to keep up in 100degree weather–do they sell Gatorade in one of those 7-11’s? Thayer–the photo of you wrapped with the Tiger–Is that the lovely dress you had made in Vietnam?–that I so love. Schuyler, you did look really cool on that motorbike–but much more beautiful holding that little baby in your arms in Agape. Zoe, loved seeing you with a paint brush in your hand creating your colorful umbrella pattern. Girls, your generosity of bringing gifts and volunteering at the orphanage is so heart warming–the Buddha is smiling and so am I. So looking forward to the China and Japan posts. Blair and Jeff–there are no words–just love for what you are giving the girls and all of us here at home. Safe travels.

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